Do You Have to Pay CAM Insurance Charges?

Posted by Lee Sterling | Posted in Landlord-Tenant, Legal, Negotiation | Posted on 25-03-2010

A Typical ShoppingCenterThe Common Area Maintenance (CAM) charges paragraph of a lease is always important. It should detail what charges are included, and, by implication, what charges are not included.

In a recent New York case *, the lease CAM paragraph didn’t define all the charges, but did indicate that they included annual property taxes. After paying CAM charges for two years, including the tenant’s proportionate share of insurance on the property, the tenant realized that, perhaps, it wasn’t liable for insurance under the terms of its lease. The tenant sued to be reimbursed for the insurance portion of the CAM charges it had paid.

The court noted that the lease didn’t define the CAM charges, other than that it included the property taxes, and that the lease did have an insurance clause obligating the landlord to maintain insurance. That insurance clause did not mention a tenant’s obligation to pay its share of those costs.

Based on the lack of definition in the CAM clause, and the lack of requirement for the tenant to pay a proportionate share in the insurance clause, the court determined that the landlord would have to reimburse the tenant for its payment of those insurance charges.

What this points out, once again, is the need to have good counsel review your proposed lease to make sure you understand your obligations as a tenant. A well-qualified Tenant Representative and your real estate attorney should be able to tell you exactly what your obligations will be under your lease.

*I review the Commercial Tenant’s lease Insider, a monthly newsletter I receive, and this case was mentioned in the February issue.  The shopping center photo is from the Merriam-Webster Visual Dictionary Online.

Who Pays When Your Customer Gets Hurt and Sues? You Or The Landlord?

Posted by Lee Sterling | Posted in Economics, Landlord-Tenant, Legal, Miscellaneous, Real Estate | Posted on 06-03-2010

slipandfall

You have leased space in a Carlsbad office/warehouse building, and your lease provides that you are responsible for interior maintenance of the premises and the landlord is responsible for the roof, exterior walls etc.

The Accident

Last year a customer walked into your office, and slipped in a puddle of water caused by a roof leak that you had complained about to the landlord, which had not been repaired at the time of the accident. The customer suffered a broken back, had major medical bills, loss of work, and possible long-term disability.

The lawsuit

Guess who gets sued!  Right, both you and the landlord. Fortunately, your insurance company settles with the accident victim, and your insurance company proceeds with the claim against the landlord. It becomes a battle between your insurance company and his insurance company. Your insurance company is claiming that the landlord should pay your insurance company for the money it paid out to the accident victim to settle the matter.

The landlord argues that the lease required you to obtain insurance, which you did, and that the Indemnification clause of the lease meant that you had to cover any damages resulting from an injury in your leased premises.

The Indemnification

So you look at your lease, and you find the indemnification clause that reads: “Tenant hereby indemnifies and agrees to save harmless landlord from and against all claims, unless such claims are caused solely (my emphasis added) by the acts or omissions of landlord, which either: (1) arise from or are in connection with the possession, use, occupation, management, repair, maintenance, or control of the Premises or any portion thereof; (2) arises from or are in connection with any act or omission of Tenant’s or Tenant’s agents; or (3) result from any default, breach, violation or non-performance of this lease or any provision of this lease by tenant.

Your insurance company’s attorney argues that the puddle on the floor was caused by the roof leak that had not been repaired after your reported the problem, and that the landlord was liable.  The landlord’s attorney argues that there was a roof leak, but you failed to maintain the premises properly and that you should have dried up the puddle so the landlord was not solely responsible for the accident.

Who wins?

You be the judge. The lesson is that one word, out of the thousands, in the lease can dramatically affect your rights and obligations. Be sure you have a knowledgeable real estate agent helping guide you, and have your lease reviewed by your real estate attorney before signing it!