A is for Apple And Also Attornment

Posted by Lee Sterling | Posted in Carlsbad, Encinitas, Landlord-Tenant, Legal, Miscellaneous, Negotiation, North County, Oceanside, Real Estate, San Diego | Posted on 30-10-2009

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We now get to the A of SNDAs (Subordination, Non-disturbance, and Attornment Agreements in leases.) First a brief recap of Subordination and Non-Disturbance. You may remember from our previous articles that if you’re a tenant, and you’ve agreed to subordinate your interest in the lease to any mortgage, trust deed of other security device, and the holder of one of those security devices forecloses, your lease may be terminated. Leases usually provide for that subordination to security devises even if they are created after the lease commences. The non-disturbance clause protects you in the event of a foreclosure (or in the event the property is sold to another owner) by providing that if you’re not in default you’ll be able to keep your lease in effect.

The attornment clause stems from the old feudal law that there was a personal obligation between the lord of the manor and his tenants, and that those obligations were reciprocal. The consent of the lord was required for a sale of the tenant’s interest, and the consent of the tenant was required for alienation (sale/transfer) of the reversion or remainder interest in the property. Thus, the lord could not alienate his reversion or remainder interest without the consent of the tenant. The consent was called an attornment. The necessity for an attornment was abolished before the American Revolution by the English Statute of Anne. In California, the common law rule eliminating the requirement of attornment has been confirmed by statute. However, just to be sure, leases contain an attornment clause that provides that if title to the property is transferred by the Lessor or if title is acquired through foreclosure or termination of a Security Device the tenant will attorn to the new owner.

The language of the SNDA in each lease has to be examined carefully because there are differences that may result from the specific language of the three inter-related clauses. There are some interesting California cases involving the interpretation of SNDAs. Be sure to have the lease reviewed by California counsel before signing any lease.

Lee Sterling was a real estate lawyer in Colorado for 27 years. He is not licensed as an attorney in California. He does have a California real estate license # 01319489.

North County Industrial Vacancy – Carlsbad Highest

Posted by Lee Sterling | Posted in Carlsbad, Economics, Industrial, Market Research, Oceanside, San Marcos, Vista | Posted on 04-05-2009

industrial-buildingGrubb & Ellis\BRE Commercial (“Grubb”) is one of the leading commercial real estate brokerage companies in the area representing landlords and commercial building owners. They put out research reports quarterly on the commercial real estate market. Their first quarter of 2009 report on the industrial market covers all of San Diego, but I’m most interested in what is going on in North County.

The Grubb Report indicates that there is a total of 14,255,418 square feet of industrial space in Carlsbad, 5,331,920 square feet in Escondido, 8,498,851 in Oceanside, 7,642,154 in San Marcos, and 12,971,905 in Vista.

The total vacancy factor in each community, which includes some space available for sublease, is: Carlsbad – 19% (with 4% sublease vacancy); Escondido 6.2%; Oceanside – 14.8%; San Marcos – 8.5%; and Vista – 7.5%.

To get a copy of the full report, go to http://is.gd/wCYP

With the high vacancy factors in Carlsbad and Oceanside now is a good time to acquire new space or renegotiate your lease at favorable terms. If you’d like assistance in that regard call me at 760-230-1492 or email me at Lee@LeeSterling.com for a no cost consultation.